Bundesliga: Baden-Baden Wins Again, Aronian & Karpov Playing

Posted by on Apr 7, 2014 in Chess News & Events | 0 comments

For the ninth year in a row OSG Baden-Baden won the German Team Championship. This season Baden-Baden clinched the title with two rounds to spare, once again underlining their supremacy in the Bundesliga. In the final weekend world #2 Levon Aronian scored 2.5/3, while 12th World Champion Anatoly Karpov scored a draw and a win.

Photo: Reinhold Faber | Other photos courtesy of the Schachbundesliga

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Viktor Bologan wins Cebanenco Memorial

Posted by on Apr 4, 2014 in Chess News & Events | 0 comments

Top Moldavian player GM Viktor Bologan emerged winner of the International Rapid Chess Festival – Veaceslav Cebanenco Memorial after an exciting last round and Armageddon tie-break.

The Veaceslav Cebanenco Memorial took place on 1-2nd April at the Republican Chess and Draughts Club, Sciusev street 111, in Chisinau, Moldova.

The main open tournament A for players rated higher than 2200 FIDE had 37 participants. The playing format was 9-round Swiss, FIDE rated, with time control 15 min + 10 sec.

Both leaders after the penultimate round, Alexei Shirov and Yuriy Kuzubov, lost in their last games with white pieces against Vitaliy Bernadskiy and Vladimir Malakhov, respectively.

Bologan took advantage of this development to leap ahead to the first place by defeating former World Champion Zhu Chen.

Viktor Bologan

Viktor Bologan

The overall winner was to be decided in a mini-match between two top finishers – Bologan with 7 points and Malakhov with best tie-break in the group with 6,5 points.

They exchanged a win for each, but then Bologan won the Armageddon tie-break to claim the top prize.

Replay games with analysis

Tournament website

Final standings:

1 GM Bologan Viktor MDA 2680 – 7
2 GM Malakhov Vladimir RUS 2777 – 6.5
3 GM Shirov Alexei LAT 2742 – 6.5
4 GM Kuzubov Yuriy UKR 2583 – 6.5
5 IM Bernadskiy Vitaliy UKR 2552 – 6.5
6 GM Lysyj Igor RUS 2666 – 6
7 IM Nigalidze Gaioz GEO 2421 – 6
8 GM Zhu Chen QAT 2438 – 5.5
9 GM Svetushkin Dmitry MDA 2628 – 5.5
10 Golub Dan MDA 2290 – 5.5
11 IM Zajarnyi Anatolyi MDA 2274 – 5
12 IM Hamitevici Vladimir MDA 2494 – 5
13 GM Sanduleac Vasile MDA 2397 – 5
14 FM Vavric Pavel MDA 2271 – 5
15 IM Itkis Boris ROU 2342 – 5
16 Iovcov Valerii MDA 2237 – 5
17 Bizovi Mihai MDA 2050 – 5
18 IM Slovineanu Viacheslav MDA 2431 – 4.5
19 IM Martemianov Iaroslav MDA 2365 – 4.5
20 Fedotov Eduard MDA 2208 – 4.5
21 IM Vedmediuc Serghei MDA 2327 – 4.5
22 FM Ogleznev Alexandr MDA 2264 – 4.5
23 GM Rogozenco Dorian ROU 2513 – 4
24 GM Nanu Costica-Ciprian ROU 2532 – 4
25 GM Solodovnichenko Yuri UKR 2564 – 4
26 FM Ungureanu Vlad ROU 2337 – 4
27 WIM Dragomirescu Angela ROU 2262 – 4
28 IM Soltanici Ruslan MDA 2359 – 4
29 FM Agafii Victor MDA 2291 – 4
30 Cerbulenco Liviu MDA 2114 – 4
31 Gorbanovsky Oleg MDA 2035 – 3.5
32 Chetrari Nikita MDA 1890 – 3.5
33 Procop Egor MDA 2070 – 3
34 Chircu Vadim MDA 2209 – 3
35 IM Petrenko Svetlana MDA 2225 – 2.5
36 Martinenco Sergiu MDA 1891 – 2.5
37 WGM Ionescu Irina ROU 2191 – 2

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Anand Wins Candidates With Room to Spare

Posted by on Mar 31, 2014 in Chess News & Events | 0 comments

In the end, there wasn’t even any drama. Viswanathan Anand sealed his victory in the Candidates Tournament with a round to spare – and to be honest, had virtually assured himself of the crown a few rounds prior to that – cementing a rematch with Magnus Carlsen later this year. In the end, Anand took first place (with 8.5 points on three wins and no losses) by a full point over Sergey Karjakin, who scored a marathon win over Levon Aronian on the final day. With all of the other games ending in draws, that sent Aronian tumbling down the tight field into a tie for 6th with Peter Svidler at a disappointing 6.5 points.

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Filipino GM Oliver Barbosa wins title in Kolkata Open

Posted by on Mar 30, 2014 in Chess News & Events | 0 comments

Grandmaster Oliver Barbosa of Philippines edged out MR Lalith Babu of PSPB on better tiebreak to win the 19th International Open GM Chess Tournament, organised by Alekhine Chess Club.

Both scored 7.5 points in ten rounds. Oliver also won a cash prize of four lakh rupees and Lalith Babu had to be content with the runner up spot and collected two lakh and seventy five thousand rupees for his splendid efforts.

The Slav defence game between Oliver Barbosa and Ziaur Rahman ended a in a draw after 38 well fought moves, with both having queens, a minor piece and three pawns each.

Oliver Babosa of Philippines drew with Ziaur Rahman of Bangladesh in the final round to win the title

Oliver Babosa of Philippines drew with Ziaur Rahman of Bangladesh in the final round to win the title

Oliver had to patiently wait for the game between Lalith and Vidit to get confirmation of his title., as a win for Vidit would have put Vidit on the top.

Lalith Babu shattered the dreams of Vidit to clinch the title in the Queens Indian defence employed by him, After Vidit exchanged the queens on 23rd move, Lalith grabbed Vidit’s two connected pawns. Vidit tried in vain to halt the onward march of Lalith’s pawns on a- and b- files in a rook ending. Lalith played correctly to force the win in 97 moves.

Lalith Babu (right) dashed the title hopes of Vidit Gujrathi

Lalith Babu (right) dashed the title hopes of Vidit Gujrathi

In another rook and pawn ending arising out of a Scotch game, top seeded Nigel Short of England used his isolated passer pawn to inflict a defeat on former national champion P. Konguvel of PSPB.

Team mates B Adhiban and Abhijit Kunte of PSPB waited for 25 moves of a Grunfeld defence game to make the formal draw, as per regulations of the tournament.

GM Henrik Danielsen of Island lost the game to Sergey Fedorchuk of Ukraine, as he did not complete 40 moves in the stipulated time control.

Sergey Fedrochuk of Ukraind defeated Henrik Danielsen of Iceland in the final round

Sergey Fedrochuk of Ukraind defeated Henrik Danielsen of Iceland in the final round

The draw result between Alekhine Chess Club’s Diptayan Ghosh and Tamil Nadu’s Kunal, pushed Diptayan out of contention for a prize, as he was placed 21st. Kunal, on 20th position was just inside the prize list. Deep Sengupta of Kolkata finished a creditable tenth place, with a win over PSPB’s grandmaster S. Arun Prasad.

India No.2 Pentala Harikrishna and Kolkata GM SS Ganguly distributed the prizes.

Landa Konstantin of Russia drew with former world under 16 champion SP Sethuraman

Landa Konstantin of Russia drew with former world under 16 champion SP Sethuraman

Oliver Barbosa receives the trophy from P Harikrishna and SS Ganguly CHief arbiter R. Anantharam is at the extreme right.

Oliver Barbosa receives the trophy from P Harikrishna and SS Ganguly Chief arbiter R. Anantharam is at the extreme right.

Final standings:

1 GM Barbosa Oliver PHI 2564 – 7.5
2 GM Lalith Babu M.R. IND 2585 – 7.5
3 GM Kunte Abhijit IND 2439 – 7
4 GM Vidit Santosh Gujrathi IND 2602 – 7
5 GM Rahman Ziaur BAN 2486 – 7
6 GM Adhiban B. IND 2608 – 7
7 GM Deepan Chakkravarthy J. IND 2496 – 6.5
8 GM Landa Konstantin RUS 2645 – 6.5
9 GM Sethuraman S.P. IND 2578 – 6.5
10 GM Sengupta Deep IND 2529 – 6.5
11 GM Grigoryan Avetik ARM 2583 – 6.5
12 GM Short Nigel D ENG 2674 – 6.5
13 GM Gopal G.N. IND 2558 – 6.5
14 GM Mchedlishvili Mikheil GEO 2639 – 6.5
15 GM Fedorchuk Sergey A. UKR 2647 – 6.5
16 GM Haznedaroglu Kivanc TUR 2462 – 6
17 IM Swapnil S. Dhopade IND 2424 – 6
18 IM Karthikeyan P. IND 2355 – 6
19 IM Ly Moulthun AUS 2429 – 6
20 Kunal M. IND 2339 – 6
21 IM Ghosh Diptayan IND 2481 – 5.5
22 GM Abdulla Al-Rakib BAN 2518 – 5.5
23 GM Debashis Das IND 2508 – 5.5
24 IM Prasanna Raghuram Rao IND 2410 – 5.5
25 GM Sundararajan Kidambi IND 2400 – 5.5
26 GM Neelotpal Das IND 2427 – 5.5
27 IM Konguvel Ponnuswamy IND 2347 – 5.5
28 GM Arun Prasad S. IND 2477 – 5.5
29 GM Laxman R.R. IND 2454 – 5.5
30 GM Danielsen Henrik ISL 2501 – 5.5
31 IM Shyam Nikil P. IND 2431 – 5.5
32 IM Ashwin Jayaram IND 2470 – 5.5
33 WIM Ivana Maria Furtado IND 2177 – 5.5
34 GM Pantsulaia Levan GEO 2606 – 5
35 IM Rathnakaran K. IND 2389 – 5
36 IM Swayams Mishra IND 2445 – 5
37 IM Satyapragyan Swayangsu IND 2389 – 5
38 GM Shyam Sundar M. IND 2507 – 5
39 Krishna C.R.G. IND 2317 – 5
40 WGM Padmini Rout IND 2356 – 5
41 GM Hossain Enamul BAN 2440 – 5
42 Harsha Bharathakoti IND 2259 – 5
43 IM Akshat Khamparia IND 2380 – 5
44 Ravi Teja S. IND 2367 – 5
45 IM Girish A. Koushik IND 2430 – 5
46 WGM Gomes Mary Ann IND 2402 – 5
47 Abhishek Kelkar IND 2286 – 4.5
48 IM Palit Somak IND 2421 – 4.5
49 Bora Safal USA 2218 – 4.5
50 Deshpande Aniruddha IND 2279 – 4.5
51 Patil Pratik IND 2236 – 4.5
52 Surendran N. IND 2242 – 4.5
53 Sagar Shah IND 2304 – 4.5
54 CM Prince Bajaj IND 2316 – 4.5
55 Karthik V. Ap IND 2221 – 4.5
56 Kulkarni Chinmay IND 2247 – 4.5
57 Vignesh Nr IND 2355 – 4
58 IM Narayanan Srinath IND 2436 – 4
59 CM Puranik Abhimanyu IND 2299 – 4
60 Roy Prantik IND 2290 – 4
61 WGM Swathi Ghate IND 2255 – 4
62 IM Saravanan V. IND 2359 – 4
63 Akash Pc Iyer IND 2263 – 4
64 Sardana Rishi AUS 2338 – 4
65 FM Islam Kh. Aminul BAN 2298 – 4
66 IM Mohota Nisha IND 2261 – 4
67 WGM Kiran Manisha Mohanty IND 2256 – 3.5
68 GM Sriram Jha IND 2433 – 3.5
69 Neelash Saha IND 1915 – 3.5
70 Pradeep Kumar R.A. IND 2295 – 3.5
71 FM Ahmed Sk. Nasir BAN 2365 – 3.5
72 Kathmale Sameer IND 2398 – 3
73 Pratyusha Bodda IND 2164 – 3
74 FM Raghunandan Kaumandur Srihari IND 2204 – 2.5
75 IM Sarkar Justin USA 2452 – 2
76 Visakh Nr IND 2374 – 2
77 Samaganova Alexandra KGZ 2029 – 1.5

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GM Saša Martinović wins Zagreb Open on tie-break

Posted by on Mar 27, 2014 in Chess News & Events | 0 comments

The 2014 Zagreb Chess Open was held on 17-24th March at the Panorama Zagreb Hotel, Krešimir Ćosić Square in Zagreb, Croatia.

The nine round Swiss tournament was organized by the Zagreb Chess Union and the Zagreb Sports Union. 197 players from ten countries competed. There were 16 Grandmasters and 15 International Masters in the field.

Grandmasters Saša Martinović, Ivan Žaja and Petar Arnaudov shared the first place with 7,5 points each. Martinović took the winner’s trophy on best tie-break score.

Zagreb

Final standings:

1 GM Martinović Saša CRO 2532 – 7.5
2 GM Žaja Ivan CRO 2465 – 7.5
3 GM Arnaudov G. Petar BUL 2459 – 7.5
4 IM Kovačević Blažimir CRO 2454 – 7
5 GM Palac Mladen CRO 2561 – 7
6 GM Kurajica Bojan BIH 2505 – 7
7 IM Jakovljević Vlado BIH 2413 – 7
8 GM Georgiev Kiril BUL 2625 – 6.5
9 GM Zelčić Robert CRO 2559 – 6.5
10 IM Lončar Robert CRO 2358 – 6.5
11 GM Brkić Ante CRO 2563 – 6.5
12 GM Cvitan Ognjen CRO 2526 – 6.5
13 IM Rogulj Branko CRO 2418 – 6.5
14 GM Ferčec Nenad CRO 2490 – 6.5
15 IM Žufić Miroslav CRO 2458 – 6.5
16 GM Šarić Ante CRO 2529 – 6.5
17 GM Nabaty Tamir ISR 2586 – 6
18 FM Krištović Marijan CRO 2292 – 6
19 FM Blažeka Matej CRO 2304 – 6
20 IM Biti Ozren CRO 2376 – 6
21 IM Lekić Dušan MNE 2433 – 6
22 MK Tica Sven CRO 2095 – 6
23 FM Mihalinčić Tomislav CRO 2319 – 6
24 WIM Frančišković Borka CRO 2290 – 6
25 GM Dizdarević Emir BIH 2518 – 6
26 GM Cebalo Mišo CRO 2425 – 6
27 IM Šale Srđan CRO 2416 – 6
28 MK Matić Željko CRO 2229 – 6
29 MK Vujčić Toni CRO 2141 – 6
30 MK Basarić Srđan CRO 2159 – 6
31 FM Makaj Marko CRO 2358 – 6
32 IM Dorić Nenad CRO 2297 – 6
33 FM Hrvačić Pavle CRO 2258 – 6
34 MK Rubil Marko CRO 2219 – 6
35 MK Frouth Nenad CRO 2225 – 6
36 FM Veleski Robert MKD 2248 – 6
37 FM Dutina Dario CRO 2253 – 6
38 NM Draganić Stjepan CRO 2167 – 6
39 GM Janković Alojzije CRO 2569 – 5.5
40 FM Bender Ivan CRO 2256 – 5.5
41 GM Jovanić Ognjen CRO 2526 – 5.5
42 IM Galić Ivan CRO 2383 – 5.5
43 NM Zečević Dean CRO 2235 – 5.5
44 IM Zelić Zdravko CRO 2377 – 5.5
45 WFM Dimitrijević Aleksandra BIH 2269 – 5.5
46 NM Iveković Zvonimir CRO 2367 – 5.5
47 MK Pećnik Leo CRO 2297 – 5.5
48 WFM Purgar Ivona CRO 2111 – 5.5
49 MK Muškardin Mario CRO 2239 – 5.5
50 FM Božinović Bogdan CRO 2256 – 5.5
51 FM Kljako Damir CRO 2199 – 5.5
52 MK Šunjić Vitomir CRO 2156 – 5.5
53 IM Majerić Zoran CRO 2259 – 5.5
54 MK Hećimović Ivan CRO 2221 – 5.5
55 FM Vuković Ivo CRO 2154 – 5.5
56 MK Plenča Jadranko CRO 2173 – 5
57 IM Plenković Zdenko CRO 2413 – 5
58 NM Iveković Božidar CRO 2259 – 5
59 MK Šribar Peter CRO 2062 – 5
60 NM Jurković Ante CRO 2312 – 5
61 MK Dragojević Miodrag CRO 2129 – 5
62 IM Jušić Zdenko CRO 2309 – 5
63 MK Turk Karlo CRO 2129 – 5
64 MK Pavić Jakov CRO 2135 – 5
65 MK Stočko Josip CRO 2253 – 5
66 FM Zelić Mladen CRO 2282 – 5
67 MK Grgurić Stjepan-Krešimir CRO 2045 – 5
68 MK Cechi Goran CRO 2183 – 5
69 Bratkovič Jakob SLO 1991 – 5
70 I Livaić Damir CRO 2053 – 5
71 II Erenda Bruno CRO 1738 – 5
72 FM Lasić Luka CRO 2253 – 5
73 MK Prlac Vedran CRO 2178 – 5
74 MK Brajdić Danko CRO 2136 – 5
75 MK Nagl Mladen CRO 2096 – 5
76 MK Jezidžić Gordan CRO 2172 – 5
77 MK Soldo Robert CRO 2139 – 5
78 MK Pavić Filip CRO 1938 – 5
79 Jelić Filip CRO 0 – 5
80 MK Vukić Aleksandar CRO 2092 – 5
81 NM Turk Tajana CRO 1962 – 5
82 MK Raljić Mirko CRO 2093 – 5
83 I Dotlić Zdravko CRO 2054 – 5
84 MK Jakupec Denis CRO 2074 – 4.5
85 Bratkovic Sham SLO 2092 – 4.5
86 MK Muha Miljenko CRO 1892 – 4.5
87 MK Jelečević Ivo CRO 2152 – 4.5
88 WFM Deur Šarić Zrinka CRO 2114 – 4.5
89 I Cvitković Filip CRO 2023 – 4.5
90 NM Iveković Ana CRO 2087 – 4.5
91 MK Ognjačević Alen CRO 2100 – 4.5
92 II Golubičić Luka CRO 1843 – 4.5
93 I Kukurin Luka CRO 1951 – 4.5
94 FM Levar Nenad CRO 2149 – 4.5
95 MK Kinez Ivo CRO 2064 – 4.5
96 MK Rađenović Stevo CRO 1997 – 4.5
97 Ladisic Alex-Sacha FRA 2017 – 4.5
98 MK Sliepčević Mladen CRO 2106 – 4.5
99 MK Padjen Zdenko CRO 2004 – 4.5
100 II Biljak Tomislav CRO 1894 – 4.5
101 MK Nikolić Emil CRO 2166 – 4.5
102 MK Kovačević Krsto CRO 2098 – 4.5
103 MK Livaić Leon CRO 2043 – 4.5
104 MK Mitrović Milivoj CRO 1985 – 4.5
105 I Vukosavić Darko CRO 1997 – 4.5
106 II Orinčić Damir CRO 1958 – 4.5
107 II Petričević Petar CRO 1962 – 4.5
108 FM Brigljević Milan CRO 2199 – 4.5
109 I Galoić Boris CRO 1975 – 4.5
110 IV Dalić Željko CRO 1732 – 4.5
111 I Deriš Antun CRO 2024 – 4.5
112 I Vukalović Željko CRO 1982 – 4.5
113 MK Takač Zvonko CRO 2020 – 4
114 NM Iveković Tihana CRO 2040 – 4
115 Aranđelović Aleksandar SRB 2079 – 4
116 MK Ikica Ante CRO 1959 – 4
117 MK Božičević Dean CRO 2027 – 4
118 I Jergović Andrija CRO 1977 – 4
119 I Vojak Daniel CRO 1911 – 4
120 MK Zelenika Zoran CRO 2086 – 4
121 FM Hadzi – Manev Ljubomir MKD 2034 – 4
122 MK Gujić Leonard CRO 1954 – 4
123 Georgieva Emilia BUL 1921 – 4
124 II Mihalinec Predrag CRO 1868 – 4
125 MK Kurečić Mladen CRO 2011 – 4
126 II Klement Dubravko CRO 1927 – 4
127 I Škvorc Emanuel CRO 1881 – 4
128 I Kovačić Damir CRO 2066 – 4
129 II Cvetko Vjekoslav CRO 1978 – 4
130 II Perić Davor CRO 1912 – 4
131 MK Ganić Martin CRO 2100 – 4
132 I Damić Dalibor CRO 1953 – 4
133 II Matana Zoran CRO 1864 – 4
134 I Mesar Darko CRO 1927 – 4
135 II Pejović Saša CRO 1888 – 4
136 Vučić Vladimir BIH 0 – 4
137 I Božičević Ivan CRO 2011 – 3.5
138 MK Raguž Dario CRO 2164 – 3.5
139 MK Blagojević Marijan CRO 2149 – 3.5
140 III Smetiško Josip CRO 1568 – 3.5
141 MK Nemec Vjekoslav CRO 2076 – 3.5
142 I Švec Darko CRO 1930 – 3.5
143 MK Babić Zvonko CRO 2191 – 3.5
144 I Križančić Josip CRO 2056 – 3.5
145 I Jambrešić Filip CRO 1800 – 3.5
146 II Glasinović Juraj CRO 1860 – 3.5
147 MK Pavčević Bruno CRO 1955 – 3.5
148 MK Blažeka Mihaela CRO 1852 – 3.5
149 I Hamer Ivan CRO 1997 – 3.5
150 I Vidić Mihajlo CRO 1853 – 3.5
151 Čanžek Zlatko GER 1839 – 3.5
152 II Mlinarić Andrija CRO 1910 – 3.5
153 III Gverić Tvrtko CRO 1751 – 3.5
154 II Mezak Damir CRO 1729 – 3.5
155 Žibrat Matija CRO 0 – 3.5
156 III Jurilj Ivan CRO 1762 – 3.5
157 NM Zelić Marina CRO 1838 – 3.5
158 IV Špilek Stjepan CRO 0 – 3.5
159 II Maleškić Bernard CRO 1897 – 3
160 II Alićajić Bajro CRO 1839 – 3
161 MK Globan Tomislav CRO 2162 – 3
162 Pavlović Branka SRB 1832 – 3
163 II Blažeka Đuro CRO 1855 – 3
164 II Mišković Branko CRO 1673 – 3
165 MK Galić Ivan CRO 1834 – 3
166 III Huljak Krešimir CRO 0 – 3
167 MK Tršinski Stjepan CRO 1894 – 3
168 III Isić Muris CRO 1746 – 3
169 II Smetiško Marija CRO 1669 – 3
170 I Požgaj Hrvoje CRO 1853 – 3
171 I Turk Vesna CRO 1728 – 3
172 Zorić Dario CRO 0 – 3
173 I Blažeka Ivana CRO 1636 – 3
174 I Filipović Tomislav CRO 2047 – 2.5
175 III Živoder Matija CRO 1731 – 2.5
176 II Križan Ivan CRO 1842 – 2.5
177 II Jukić Dario CRO 1874 – 2.5
178 III Gavran Marinko CRO 1651 – 2.5
179 IV Tufekčić Zvjezdan CRO 1824 – 2.5
180 IV Požgaj Dražen CRO 1657 – 2.5
181 IV Domazet Danijel CRO 1800 – 2.5
182 Kaplan Jan CRO 0 – 2.5
183 Pavlinić Matej CRO 0 – 2.5
184 Drašković Ivica CRO 1652 – 2.5
185 I Golemović Tvrtko CRO 1728 – 2.5
186 III Svornik Zvonimir CRO 1735 – 2.5
187 MK Golub Nikolina CRO 1485 – 2.5
188 MK Klem Davor CRO 2043 – 2
189 Budiselić Ante CRO 1647 – 2
190 MK Muha Magdalena CRO 1518 – 2
191 I Katulić Zlatko CRO 1853 – 2
192 II Vukovojac Vedran CRO 1857 – 1.5
193 Špilek Kristina CRO 0 – 1.5
194 II Iveković Jelena CRO 1385 – 1.5
195 Vuljanić Ana CRO 0 – 1.5
196 II Boljat Igor CRO 1923 – 1
197 II Smetiško Lucija CRO 1732 – 1

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Anand wins Novelty of the Year award

Posted by on Mar 26, 2014 in Chess News & Events | 0 comments

Anand in Zurich

Anand in Zurich

Viswanathan Anand is the clear winner of the 2013 New In Chess Yearbook Novelty of the Year. He received 48% of the votes for his dazzling display of fireworks in his win over Levon Aronian in the Tata Steel Chess tournament 2013. The move 12… c5! in a Meran Slav opened up the position and initiated brilliant attack that reminded chess fans of the famous game Rotlevi – Rubinstein.

Magnus Carlsen came second and fourth in the contest with two novelties in the Ponziani! He got his second place for his novelty 9…f6 when he was playing black against Hou Yifan in Tata Steel and he got his fourth place for 12.b4 in the same opening in the same tournament, but playing white against Harikrishna.

The third place was for Peter Svidler in his favorite Grünfeld. With white he played 7.f4 in the 5.Bd2 Grünfeld.

Yearbook 110 has just been published and is packed with 250 pages of opening news. Among the higlights of this issue are the fairytale chess openings of Baadur Jobava, the reversed Budapest that Magnus Carlsen played in a Blitz game (against Anand!) and three surveys on an early h4 in the Caro-Kann.

Anand has annotated his game against Arionian for New In Chess magazine 2013#2:

SL 9.2 – D46
Levon Aronian – Vishy Anand
Wijk aan Zee 2013 (4)
[Annotator: Vishy Anand]

This game was played in Round 4. So far my tournament had gone very well, with my third-round win over Caruana.

1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 e6 5.e3

01_5_e3

Levon has done a bit of everything against the Meran, and every time he makes a choice at the board you have to think, ‘Ah, so what do I want against this?’

5…Nbd7 6.Bd3 dxc4 7.Bxc4 b5 8.Bd3 Bd6

01_5_e3

By the time we got this far I had the feeling we might be moving towards the line that would arise shortly.

9.0‑0 0‑0 10.Qc2

This is the main move here.

10…Bb7 11.a3

And this, too, is the main move. You can also play 11.e4 e5 12.h3 or 11.h3 immediately, or other moves.

03_11_a3

11…Rc8

And now I was happy to play this, because I had this big idea. 11…Rc8 in itself should not be a shocker, because Kasimdzhanov already used it against Topalov in the Grand Prix in London. That game saw 12.b4 c5 13.bxc5 Bxf3 14.gxf3 Nxc5 15.dxc5 Rxc5 16.f4 Nd5 17.Bb2 Nxc3 18.Bxc3 Qc7 19.Rfc1 Rc8 20.Bxh7+ Kh8 21.Bd3 Rxc3 22.Qxc3 Qxc3 23.Rxc3 Rxc3 24.Bxb5 Bxa3 25.Kg2 g6 26.Rd1 Rc7 27.Rd7 Rxd7 28.Bxd7 Kg7 29.e4 Kf6 30.Kf3 a5 31.e5+ Ke7 32.Ba4 Bc5 33.h3 Bb6 34.Bb5 Bc5 35.Ba4 Bb6 36.Bb5 Bc5 37.Ba4 draw.

12.Ng5

At first sight this seems more logical. If instead of 11…Rc8 I had played 11…a6, then 12.Ng5 is an important line there. And if I continued 12…Bxh2+ then I’d rather have the pawn on a6 than the rook on c8. But the advantage of 11…Rc8 is that I can now play:

12…c5!

The point of 11…Rc8, and easy to miss. Black ignores White’s move.

04_12__c5

13.Nxh7

After 13.Bxh7+ Kh8 14.Be4 Nxe4 15.Ngxe4 Bb8 Black has good compensation.

05_15__Bb8_analysis_diagram

Either I take on d4 and you have an isolated pawn there, or he takes on c5 and you have two bishops staring at his kingside, plus a rook ready to swing over to the kingside. That’s a helluva lot for a pawn. Plus you have drawing mechanisms like 16.Nxc5 Bxh2+ 17.Kxh2 Qh4+ 18.Kg1 Bxg2.

After 13.dxc5 Black takes with the rook, 13…Rxc5, and once he frees himself, his play is quite easy.

Finally, in case of 13.Nxb5, 13…Bxh2+ now works: 14.Kxh2 Ng4+ 15.Kg1 Qxg5, as White’s kingside is much more exposed, because my light-squared bishop is not staring at a pawn on c6, but it’s actually staring at g2, and after 16.f3 Black plays 16…cxd4, with a clear advantage.

13…Ng4

This, too, was more or less prep.

06_13__Ng4

14.f4

After 14.h3 I remembered 14…Bh2+! (on 14…Qh4 15.f4 is strong) 15.Kh1 Qh4, with good compensation for Black both after 16.Be4 Bxe4 17.Qxe4 f5 18.Qxe6+ Kxh7 19.Qxd7 cxd4 20.exd4 Bb8 21.Kg1 Bh2+ 22.Kh1 and the bishop goes back to b8 and you repeat, and 16.d5 Rfd8.

However, after 14.f4 I couldn’t remember all the details.

14…cxd4 15.exd4

07_15_exd4

Here I spent about half an hour trying to remember what exactly Black was supposed to do. But of course it’s a big help if you know that basically Black is OK. That bit is clear; you just have to figure out how. And I remembered a line in which I got a knight to d3 and from this I figured out that the right move had to be 15…Bc5! So it was my prep, but I worked it out at the board again.

For the sake of completeness, taking the exchange with 15.Nxf8 would give Black excellent compensation after 15…Bxf8 16.h3 dxc3 17.hxg4 Nf6.

15…Bc5!

As you may have noticed, after 15…Qh4 White could have transposed to the first comment between brackets after White’s 14th move (the one in which Black doesn’t interpolate 14…Bh2+!) 16.h3

08_15___Bc5

16.Be2

This is actually a mistake. But at the board everything looks scary and unlike me he didn’t know that White’s position was good.

After 16.dxc5 Nxc5 17.Nxf8 Nxd3 I get my knight to d3, but he manages to free his pieces:

09_16___Nxd3 analysis_diagram

18.h3 Qd4+ 19.Kh1 Ndf2+ 20.Rxf2 Nxf2+ 21.Kh2 Kxf8 22.Qh7 Nd3 23.Qh8+ Ke7 24.Qh4+ f6 25.Qg3 Kf7 26.Be3, and this should end in a draw.

10_16_Be2

16…Nde5!!

Found after a little bit of effort. It’s obviously important to start in this order. As 16…Bxd4+ 17.Kh1 Nxh2 (17…Nde5 18.fxe5) runs into 18.Ng5!. And, to be honest, once you see the right ideas, the rest of the game plays itself.

17.Bxg4

The knight cannot be taken, 17.fxe5, because of 17…Qxd4+ 18.Kh1 Qg1+ 19.Rxg1 Nf2 mate.

11_16___Nde5

17…Bxd4+ 18.Kh1 Nxg4

Here I had to see that 19…f5 wins against both his 19th moves.

19.Nxf8

After 19.Ng5 f5 the win is a bit slower, but White is still helpless after 20.h3 Rf6 21.Nf3 Rh6.

13_19_Nf8

19…f5!

Here it’s important too. I should avoid 19…Qh4, because of 20.Qh7+, and White saves himself.

20.Ng6 Qf6 21.h3

There is not much left to say. If he plays 21.Ne5 then 21…Nxh2 wins.

21…Qxg6 22.Qe2 Qh5

Attacking the h3-pawn.

14_22___Qh5

23.Qd3?

I guess he got a bit tired at the end of the game.

He could have prolonged the agony with 23.Rf3, but I don’t think it would have changed the outcome: 23…Nf2+ 24.Kh2 (or 24.Rxf2 Qxh3+ 25.Kg1 Qxg2 mate) 24…Bxf3 25.Qxf3 Qxf3 26.gxf3 Bxc3 (26…Nd3 also wins) 27.bxc3 Rxc3, and Black wins.

15_23_Qd3

23…Be3

And after this move he had to resign immediately.

At the press conference I brought up the comparison with Rotlevi-Rubinstein, which came to mind during the game. But I am sure Gelfand would have recognized it immediately as well, because he is also a big Rubinstein fan. I saw some very flattering reactions to our game, evergreen being one of them, and it would be silly to pretend that I didn’t find this game incredibly beautiful, especially to play. I am quite proud of it.

Chessdom

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Shocking 9th Round Candidates’: Anand Wins, Aronian & Kramnik Go Down

Posted by on Mar 23, 2014 in Chess News & Events | 0 comments

Sunday was a pretty good day for Vishy Anand. In a shocking 9th round of the 2014 FIDE Candidates’ Tournament in Khanty-Mansiysk, the ex-World Champion defeated Veselin Topalov, while his closest rivals Levon Aronian and Vladimir Kramnik both lost, to Shakhriyar Mamedyarov and Sergey Karjakin respectively. With five rounds to go, Anand effectively has a 1.5 point lead over Aronian because he will win a possible tiebreak on mutual result.

ChessVibes

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