Q&A: Is the strategy “Total Destruction” good in chess?

Posted by on Feb 1, 2013 in Chess Strategy FAQ | 3 comments

Question by Yogopuffs: Is the strategy “Total Destruction” good in chess?
So sometimes, in real war, A huge army will go through a city, ruining everything, setting it on fire, shooting everybody, and they do that until they get to their destination. If i get my castle (or whatever the thing that can only go sideways or straight” up to my opponents side, and start eating every pawn one by one from the side, since they can’t eat me, will that work?

Best answer:

Answer by jayson s
No.
Professional players make sure that their pawn is protected by a minor or a major piece, if you attack it with your rook (castle) it will get killed.

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How to learn to play chess?

Posted by on Feb 1, 2013 in Chess Strategy FAQ | 8 comments

Question by mother0857: How to learn to play chess?
I know the rule but I just figure I am not a deep thinkers (I cannot forsee more than 2 moves)
what should I do?
I mean I love the game chess, it is really strategy.

Best answer:

Answer by devin54325
just keep playing the game, take longer if you need to, chess isn’t a race

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I want to read some chess books to better my game?

Posted by on Feb 1, 2013 in Chess Strategy FAQ | 4 comments

Question by admiral1789: I want to read some chess books to better my game?
I play against Chessmaster and have a rating which varies from 900 to 1100. I’m going to Barnes and Noble later today and some recommendations would be appreciated.

Best answer:

Answer by Eddie H
If you can find Andy Soltis’ book, “How to Choose A Chess Move,” I’d recommend that. There is also a older, similar book by him called “The Inner Game of Chess: How to Calculate and Win” that might be more readily available, since it was published by a US publisher. It might be out of print, though.

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How to learn about opening theory in chess?

Posted by on Feb 1, 2013 in Chess Strategy FAQ | 0 comments

Question by Sonof Dimwit: How to learn about opening theory in chess?
I’m trying to learn some good openings. I looked at the MCO, but it just has the moves and even the charts are hard to follow. I’d like a book that explains the moves and why they are better or worse than others.

Best answer:

Answer by non_cre8tive.name
The best book for what you’re looking for in my opinion would be “The Complete book of Chess Strategy” by IM Jeremy Silman. He is a world-class teacher, writer and player. He’s also coached the United States delegation to the World Junior Championship and taken his team all over the world.

The book starts out with basic opening strategy, castling, development, fianchetto and then delves into the various opening systems. He touches on 45 different opening systems in all. Each with the moves and the ideas behind them. He focuses more on the theory behind each opening than just memorizing long variations. They are in alphabetical order so if you have a specific opening in mind it’s easy to find or you can simply go through each one briefly and see what piques your interest. It covers all the major openings that you would ever encounter.

The book also goes into middlegame and endgame strategy as well. To be a complete player, you must understand that you want to keep the endgame in mind from the very first move. It is all connected and not three completely seperate entities. So my advice is to study the entire book and not just the section on opening strategies. Once you see the game as a whole, it is much easier to form a good plan right from the beginning.

Added Note: As I’ve mentioned in previous answers, narrow down your choice of openings to only a couple for each color and stick with them until you really feel comfortable and know all the subtle nuances. It is not realistic, nor wise to spend your time trying to learn all the various openings.

Hope that helps!

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Where do I go to learn opening chess theory?

Posted by on Jan 28, 2013 in Chess Strategy FAQ | 3 comments

Question by E. Shawn: Where do I go to learn opening chess theory?
I would like to start learning opening chess theory. Not just moves, but the advantages and disadvantages that each opening along with its variation provides as well as other things important in the opening. Thanks!

Best answer:

Answer by Knowledge seeker
there are two books you can find at almost any bookstore including borders barnes and nobles etc.
first one is chess openings for white
second one is chess openings for black

also you could type in the opening on google and look at it on wikipedia. for example type in 1.e4 and then google will pull up king pawn opening on wikipedia tell how it is advantageous or dis advantageous and how to best use it. very theoretical.

i always do kings pawn opening because if they use sicilian defence you can use sicilian grand prix attack look it up. also the scandinavian defence is easy to counter so 1.e4 known as kings pawn opening is best.

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What’s the best strategy you need to play chess and how to play chess?

Posted by on Jan 21, 2013 in Chess Strategy FAQ | 4 comments

Question by my_7stars: What’s the best strategy you need to play chess and how to play chess?
I need an answer immediately. I’m participating for a chess competition in my school. So, I must win the game and I’ll need the best strategy. My teacher said that we must have strategy while playing chess and I don’t know what it is. This is my second time participating in a chess competition and during my first time, I lost. I really really want to win this and need anybody’s help. So, to those who have experience in participating or always playing chess or expert in chess or…whatever. Teach me how.

Thank you.

Best answer:

Answer by JumpmanEvolution
Take your time and think of what your opponent may do after your move and the results of your move. Also try to set your opponent up for a trap.

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